Registration and Programme

Details of registration costs and the conference program can be found below. Registration closes on 24 June 2022. NB: Only those who have registered for the conference will be provided a copy of the FULL programme which includes Zoom links.

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Keynote lectures:

Professor Holly Crocker (University of South Carolina)

'Affects, Emotions, and Intersectional Subjectivity in the Book of Margery Kempe'

This paper turns to the Book of Margery Kempe to investigate a model of subjectivity that is connected to others through a raucous version of communal life. As I suggest, Margery Kempe works to enact the same version of subjectivity as the women who comfort and care for her—one that is embodied, affective, and aggressively dependent. In refusing to keep her spirituality to herself, either through her traveling or through her weeping, Kempe extends a feminist form of subjectivity to all members of her community. Despite the important challenge her emotional and affective reconfiguration of subjectivity achieves, her Book also shows the perils of treating all forms of vulnerability as if they are the same. Notwithstanding her voluntary poverty, it remains true that Kempe is not as destitute as many of those with whom she travels. Similarly, the responsiveness of Christ to Kempe’s plight shows her spiritual privilege in the face of material hardship. My paper confronts Kempe’s attempts to weaponize vulnerability, in order to suggest the importance of intersectionality to considerations of the subjectivity that Kempe constructs through her revolutionary reconfigurations of affective intensities and emotional communities.

 

Holly Crocker is the author of Chaucer’s Visions of Manhood (Palgrave, 2007), co-editor of Medieval Literature: Criticism and Debates (Routledge, 2014; with D. Vance Smith), and editor of Comic Provocations: Exposing the Corpus of Old French Fabliaux (Palgrave, 2006). Holly's articles have appeared in The Chaucer Review, ExemplariaThe Journal of Early Modern Cultural StudiesThe Journal of Medieval and Early Modern StudiesMedieval Feminist ForumNew Medieval LiteraturesShakespeare QuarterlyStudies in the Age of ChaucerStudies in English Literature, 1500–1900, and numerous edited collections.

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Professor Brian Cummings (University of York)

'Shakespeare on Emotion and Memory'

Shakespeare's Twelfth Night refers to a religious ritual in its title which is then seemingly excised from the play. It appears to conform in that way to what Stephen Greenblatt in Shakespearean Negotiations (1988) has called ‘a sense of rituals and beliefs that are no longer efficacious, that have been emptied out’. Yet the play does not conform to such an antithesis of performance and belief. Rather, it is full of mimetic forms of emotion which embody a sense of ritual that revives and reforms social memory. This lecture examines both social ritual and festive forms (both real and fictional) via analogies with liturgy and masque on the one hand, and theories of memory and emotion on the other. In the process, it suggests a rewriting of the boundaries of metaphor and embodiment, as well as the sacred and secular, in the Renaissance reception of emotion. 

Brian Cummings is Professor of English at the University of York. He is known for his research in a number of fields, including Shakespeare and Renaissance literature; Erasmus, humanism and the history of philosophy; religion and secularity; the history of the book; the Bible and the Book of Common Prayer; poetry and poetics (including modern poetry and literary theory).

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Associate Professor Shino Konishi (Australian Catholic University)

'Recasting Australia’s Early History'

For a long time, Australia had a seemingly incontrovertible origin date, marked by the establishment of the first British colony in 1788. 26 January, commemorated as Australia Day, has been received with growing antipathy, first publicly acknowledged in 1938 when Aboriginal protestors declared it a Day of Mourning. This opposition has become more pronounced since the nation’s Bicentenary in 1988, which was reframed as Invasion Day by Aboriginal activists and their advocates. Debate about the continued celebration of Australia’s ostensible British origins have become more acute in recent years, with growing support for the Change the Date Campaign.

While this changing reception is largely driven by the recognition of the trauma wrought by colonisation on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, there has also long been a push to better acknowledge the earlier histories and legacies of non-Anglo encounters with Australia that preceded British colonisation, particularly that of Macassan, Dutch, and French sojourners. Recovering and re-animating these early-modern encounters is not just the preserve of academic historians, but has also generated popular engagement and reception, sparking “what if?” counter-histories about Australia’s past. Moreover, for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people these early modern encounters with non-Anglo visitors provide an opportunity to recover histories of mutual accommodation and exchange, as well as effective resistance, histories which seemingly contrast with Australia’s colonial past. These non-Anglo early modern encounters provide a historical narrative which, as a history produced by the Tiwi Land Council (1995) attests, allows Aboriginal people to recall “with pride” their “rich and ancient history” of interaction with Asian and Dutch people that centres Indigenous people as opposed to British colonists in our national history.

Shino Konishi is an Aboriginal historian and descends from the Yawuru people of Broome, Western
Australia. She is an Associate Professor in the Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences at the
Australian Catholic University. Her publications include The Aboriginal Male in the Enlightenment
World
(2012), and a number of edited collections including a special issue of the Journal of Australian
Studies
on 'Feeling the Past: Indigenous History and Emotion' (2020).

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Special Events

Awarding of the ANZAMEMS Prizes

Awarding of the ANZAMEMS Early Career Fellowships, ANZAMEMS–ARC Humanities Award for Original Research, Philippa Maddern ECR Publication Prize, Patricia Crawford Publication Prize, the inaugural Parergon Publication Prize, and the inaugural Constant Mews Early Career Publication Prize.

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Talk by Lee Kinsella (curator of the Cruthers Collection of Women’s Art at The University of Western Australia)

chair Emeritus Prof Richard Read (The University of Western Australia)

'Bodily intelligence – past-present engagements with art'

 

 

 

 

My presentation will be illustrated by works of art that are currently on display in an at the Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery, entitled Sustaining the art of practice. I will speak about the challenges inherent in curating an exhibition that seeks to make visible the intangible ties between people and places that are tethered to art objects.  I highlight the experiential engagement that is possible in the Gallery and suggest that the art object is means by which the bodies of artist and audience can brush up against each other.

Lee Kinsella is a writer and visual arts curator. Raised in the Wheatbelt town of Gillingarra in Western Australia, she is currently curator of the Cruthers Collection of Women’s Art at The University of Western Australia.

 

She has curated and managed exhibitions at Australian state and national public institutions, including the Art Gallery of Western Australia, The Australian War Memorial and The National Film and Sound Archive (formerly ScreenSound Australia). Kinsella has written catalogue essays, articles and contributed to several books on Australia art. In 2016, she has curated a survey exhibition of the work of contemporary Western Australian artist, Miriam Stannage. The exhibition was launched at the Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery in conjunction with a monograph on the artist edited by Kinsella. Her 2021 exhibition Paper Cut showcased works on paper in dialogue with community groups who occupied a residency space within the Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery. A related symposium, entitled Stories and Solidarity in which Australian and International artists discussed the power of storytelling, was co-presented by UWA and the Asian Art Museum, San Francisco

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Remembering Dr Anne Scott

A scholar with diverse interests, Anne Scott was particularly known for her work on poverty and charity in the later Middle Ages. Joining the editorial committee of Parergon in 2002, Anne Scott became co-editor of the journal in 2006 and then sole editor from 2010 until 2016. She was the Convenor of the ARC Network for Early European Research (NEER) from 2006 until 2010.


A longstanding member, office holder and President of the Perth Medieval and Renaissance Group (PMRG), and a life member of both PMRG and ANZAMEMS, Anne Scott made a scholarly and amiable contribution to Medieval and Early Modern studies that will continue for many years to come.


The Perth Medieval and Renaissance Group (Inc.) invites ANZAMEMS conference delegates to join us for commemoration of Dr Anne Scott's life and work.

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Concerts

The Irwin St Collective have generously provided delegates at the 2022 ANZAMEMS conference with access to two recordings of performances on YouTube. The Irwin Street Collective is a performance group of UWA Conservatorium of Music staff, alumni, current students and distinguished scholars who research and perform historical or traditional styles of music.

The Irwin Street Collective perform Beethoven's Spring Sonata: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VIR8Mtu_Lq8

 

The Irwin Street Collective presents Vivaldi's Sovente il sole: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AGV2KMj5nNM

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Jody Quackenbush, The butcher shop, Northbridge, 2013, giclée print on archival paper, 42 x 59.4 cm  Cruthers Collection of Women’s Art, The University of Western Australia

Jody Quackenbush, The butcher shop, Northbridge, 2013, giclée print on archival paper, 42 x 59.4 cm, Cruthers Collection of Women’s Art, The University of Western Australia 

 
 

Registration 

Registration costs for the 2022 ANZAMEMS conference are listed below (all rates contain GST). NB: There is also a small booking fee that will be charged by TryBooking.

 

To join ANZAMEMS and access the discount registration rates, please visit their website: https://www.anzamems.org/?page_id=75

ANZAMEMS Full

$33.00 AUD. 

 

Full registration rate for ANZAMEMS members only, to attend the 4-day ANZAMEMS conference, to be held online.

ANZAMEMS Concession

$16.50 AUD

Concession registration rate for ANZAMEMS members only (for postgraduate students, ECRs, and the unwaged) to attend the 4-day ANZAMEMS conference, to be held online.

Non-ANZAMEMS Full

$110.00 AUD

Full registration rate, for non-ANZAMEMS members to attend the 4-day ANZAMEMS conference, to be held online.

Non-ANZAMEMS Concession

$55.00 AUD

Concession registration rate (for postgraduate students, ECRs, and the unwaged) for non-ANZAMEMS members to attend the 4-day ANZAMEMS conference, to be held online.

Publishers

$165.00 AUD

Registration rate for publishers to attend the 4-day ANZAMEMS conference, to be held online.

ANZAMEMS Full [Day]

$11.00 AUD

Full registration rate for ANZAMEMS members only, to attend 1 day of the ANZAMEMS conference, to be held online.

ANZAMEMS Concession [Day]

$5.50 AUD

Concession registration rate (for postgraduate students, ECRs, and the unwaged) for ANZAMEMS members only, to attend 1 day of the ANZAMEMS conference, to be held online.

Non-ANZAMEMS Full [Day]

$44.00 AUD

Full registration rate for non-ANZAMEMS members to attend 1 day of the ANZAMEMS conference, to be held online.

Non-ANZAMEMS Concession [Day]

$22.00 AUD

Concession registration rate (for postgraduate students, ECRs, and the unwaged) for non-ANZAMEMS members to attend 1 day of ANZAMEMS conference, to be held online.